Nov

Straight from the Spout -Nov 2010

2010-11-01 15:00

The University of Vienna says fuel consumption is 17% less than it would have been if it was not for the need to satisfy Euro 5 emissions. The Opec meeting of oil ministers that took place when this edition of FuelWatch was being written confirmed they were satisfied with a price of between US$70 and US$80 dollars a barrel and would not at this stage cut production. Opec supplies about 62% of the Western world’s oil.

Petro SA seems to be growing more confident that it will get the nod to go ahead with its 360 000 bpd refinery near Coega in the Eastern Cape. Discussions with the Angolan government, as a possible partner in the venture, look promising.

Did you know that emissions tax on passenger cars is fundamentally guesswork?

There are no real universally agreed standards as to how the rolling road tests should be conducted to define acceptable limits for exhaust emissions. So called testing standards are very much dependent on what various countries want to achieve. The most important emissions are not regulated for most vehicle types. These include Nox, CO and PM. The EU wants to strive for a maximum of 120 grams of CO2 per km for passenger cars, but only new cars. Currently the emissions should be at 140 grams/km. However, it slipped back 160 grams for some.

Not all vehicle manufacturers are agreed on the merit of a universal target. Some want 80 grams/km by 2020. Others – especially the makers of large German sedans , want 120 grams/km and a bit more time to get there. The tests are voluntary and do not necessarily take into account the impact of speed and poor driving styles.

According to the truck builders I spoke to at the IAA, there is not yet a business case to discuss this with the authorities. Standards for trucks will have to be a lot more practical and take into account a variety of typical trucking operations such as long distance haulage, short haul, stop/start and others. It won’t be any time soon we are likely to see emissions tax extended to trucks.

Tags:
COMMENT ON THIS STORY
0 comments

Add Your Comment

twenty − 14 =